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It's been a long time coming... and now, it almost looks surreal.  For years, many people have protested in front of this building... always trying to make sure they stayed on the public sidewalk so they wouldn't be breaking the law.  For years, many people have witnessed in front of this building... hoping to reach maybe just one young woman for whom they could make a difference... hoping they could help her choose life.  For years, many people have prayed in front of this building... prayed for the young mothers and their decisions.... prayed for the babies that would never know life outside their mother's womb... For years, many people prayed in front of this building... prayed for this day.

Prayers for this day began going all the way back to January 22, 1973.  That's the day the US Supreme Court decided the US Constitution granted women the constitutional right to an abortion.  That day they then struck down many state and federal abortion laws.  I keep a copy of the US Constitution with me.  I have found no place in the Constitution that grants a person the right to kill another person.  The way the Supreme Court justified it in 1973 was by saying the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment provides a "fundamental right to privacy."  Now, somehow, they determined a right to privacy is equivalent to a right to an abortion.

Erin McCarty
Erin McCarty
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Then, on Friday, June 24th, 2022, almost 50 years later, the US Supreme Court decided to overturn Roe V. Wade.  They did not make abortion illegal in the United States, but rather, gave the decision back to the individual states to decide. A decision that belonged to the states from the beginning.  Essentially, the Supreme Court removed themselves from the debate to let each state decide.  And Louisiana did decide years ago.

Louisiana voters determined that abortion should not be legal in the Pelican State, and enacted "Trigger Laws" to go into effect should Roe V. Wade ever be overturned. It was finally overturned in June.  Now, after several months of liberal judges ruling Louisiana's trigger laws were unconstitutional, after months of appeals and legal wrangling, prayers were answered.

A search of the Walker-Alley & Associates website doesn't show the listing, not one that I could find.  And a call to the agent didn't get an answer, so I don't know for how much the building is listed.

Wouldn't it be awesome if that, after so many years of what went on there, wouldn't it be justice if a church bought it and used it as an outreach and counseling center for the community.  Or maybe an actual medical clinic, providing real health treatments and counseling for women, where they can get the care they need.  Regardless of it's future... it's going to be a much better use of the space than the last 42 years.

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