How many times have you passed the corner of Youree and Stoner and marveled at the tank and log cannon outside the gates of Fort Humbug? If you're like me....countless.

You may have heard the stories of the activities of Fort Humbug during the Civil War, but this post is still an active part of the US Army and Louisiana National Guard. I have always been curious about what they do presently on the other side of the fence, so I decided I would find out.

First a little history from RoadsideAmerica.com:

Fort Humbug was originally a Confederate fort named Fort Turnbull. The commander charred a bunch of logs and placed them along a hillside overlooking the Red River, hoping they would look like cannons. Rebel General McGruder said, "That's not going to work. That's a humbug" -- but it did, and the name stuck. Fort Humbug has that name to this day.

Present Day Fort Humbug is the home of the headquarters of the 2nd Squadron/108th Calvary. During wartime, the 108th Cavalry can deploy two motorized troops, or companies, to serve as armored reconnaissance for the 256th Infantry based out of Lafayette. They provide the eyes and ears for the commanders to find hostile forces so that those enemies may be engaged. They also have a support company that travels with the cavalry, supplying trucks, cooks, maintenance, and anything else to help the mission.

During peacetime, Fort Humbug is prepared to handle anything the governor needs them to do in the state. Humbug was instrumental in the last 18 months in the search and rescue of hundreds of people during the floods throughout Louisiana. Humbug has a company of boats, marine vehicles, and rescue units they can deploy to any location in the state to assist in any disaster, whether it be hurricanes, floods, tornadoes or just traffic control for people trying to evacuate an area.

So you see, there's a lot going on in Fort Humbug.

And just so you know...because I asked...no they don't have tanks anymore...just the one out front. But at least it's a real tank and not just a charred log.

There's one of those as well.