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When it comes to history, the Great State of Louisiana is loaded.  Not that it's a competition, but the Sportsman's Paradise's first settlement was founded way back in 1699 - and in the time between then and now, a lot has happened here.

Trying to decide just which spot in Louisiana is the most historic is like trying to find the most delicious part of your steak from 2 Johns - it's nearly impossible!  That being said, the folks at Reader's Digest (AKA what we read in the bathroom before phones) have done the research to find the most historic spot in each and every state in the U.S., and they have picked a very special building in Louisiana to bestow that honor upon.

via Google Maps
via Google Maps
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After many arguments and re-calculations, the most historic building in all of Louisiana is:  The Cabildo in New Orleans' famous Jackson Square.  It was built by the Spanish after the great fire of 1788 that destroyed a huge chunk of the city, including the building that used to be where the Cabildo now stands.  The building was constructed between 1795 and 1799, and has been the most enduring landmark in the state since then.

New Orleans Celebrates the Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial
Scott Olson/Getty Images
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Once you learn that "Cabildo" roughly translates in to "Town Hall," the sheer amount of history that happened in and around this building makes a whole lot of sense.  The Cabildo was the site of the historic sight of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, which doubled the size of our country for a mere $15 million.

Map Of Louisiana
Hulton Archive/Getty Images
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Then, the building served as the center of the New Orleans government until 1853.  That's when it became the home of the Louisiana State Supreme Court until 1908 when the Cabildo was converted into a museum that houses some of the most important historical artifacts in this entire nation.

We almost lost this Louisiana treasure to a fire in 1988, when the building was heavily damaged by a raging fire.  Thanks to some 600-year-old French timber-framing techniques and some master craftsmen, the Cabildo was restored to its former glory and still stands that way today.

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Louisiana Vampire Author Anne Rice's New Orleans Mansion is For Sale

Before famed Louisiana author Anne Rice died in December of 2021, she brought us an incredible wealth of literature. Starting in 1976 with her first published book Interview with the Vampire, Rice captured the imagination of fans around the world. In total she penned 36 novels, including four under the nom de plume A.N. Roquelaure, two more under a different pen name (Anne Rampling), one with her son, Christopher Rice, and one non-fiction book. Her success brought her enough money to purchase this historic (and reportedly haunted) mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Now, this magnificent piece of literary history is up for sale - and it's even been reduced. The price has been slashed by $600,000, and now sits just below the $4 million mark.

If you like what you see, and you'd like to live like the Louisiana Vampire Queen Anne Rice did - just visit the realtor's page and put in an offer!

Louisiana's Teche River Tower Is a Modern Masterpiece You Can Rent!

If you are looking for an out-of-the-ordinary Airbnb stay in Louisiana, look no further than this beauty! Just over a 3-hour drive is all that's standing between you and an awesome weekend on the Teche River staying in this work of art! Well, that and you'll need to book your stay!