Once the first cold front of the season rolls through south Louisiana, and the highs drop below the 80s, you know what time it is:

That's right. It's roux time.

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Charlie Andrews via YouTube
Charlie Andrews via YouTube
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So as we get ready for that cooler weather to hit the state, we have to make sure we have our flour, our oil, and whatever we're turning our roux into (it is gumbo time? I believe it is - even if it's in pot pie form) at the ready.

The basic roux in south Louisiana is pretty simple when it comes to ingredients. It's equal parts oil and flour, cooked in a skillet. The problem for a lot of folks is knowing when the roux is ready. You can't really leave it on the stove to cook as it'll burn. You have to babysit that staple of the South Louisiana kitchen until it's ready.

But... when is it ready? It seems like everyone has a different opinion on how dark they want their roux to be. One recipe we've seen calls for two beers - by the time you're done drinking the second beer, your roux should be as dark as a well-worn penny.

But some like it darker.

Here's one guide we found floating around social media, with the nine stages of roux you'll come across labeled according to what recipe you'd use it in.

Credit: Facebook
Credit: Facebook
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I dunno... I've seen what this photo calls "burnt" used in some pretty good gumbos before. What do y'all think?

The Best Fall Cooking Louisiana Has To Offer

Get your roux, trinity, and andouille together. It's time for the best Cajun and Creole cooking to celebrate the fall weather.

Gallery Credit: Joe Cunningham

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