Are economic policies at the state level hurting the chances of Shreveport - and other cities and towns in the state - of making an economic recovery? That's the topic tackled by 101.7 / 710 KEEL's Robert J Wright and Erin McCarty, as the morning duo discuss the importance of Lousiana's fiscal policies and the upcoming Shreveport mayoral election, specifically, whether higher taxes at the state level might inhibit the city's attempts to attract new businesses. To listen, start the KEEL Facebook video at 2:34:44.

In a recent article at washingtonexaminer.com, the increased sales tax passed during the recent special legislative session, is held up as an example of Louisiana taking more money from its citizens, while neighboring states are taking less:

"Florida, the nation’s third most populous state after California and Texas, Republican Gov. Rick Scott is getting ready to close out his second term having cut taxes every single year since taking office in 2011. In total, he has provided more than $10 billion in relief to Sunshine State taxpayers.

 

Texas...already boasts no income tax, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott enacted a $4 billion two-year tax cut package shortly after taking office in 2015. Moving forward, Abbott has committed to delivering further tax relief in 2019.

 

In Arkansas, Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson cut taxes for middle-income households right after taking office in 2015 and then used 2017 to cut taxes for low-income households.

 

Mississippi, has also become a more attractive place to do business and invest in recent years. The state (enacted) $415 million in tax relief two years ago, which was the largest tax cut in state history. The 2016 tax cut featured a phase out of the franchise tax as well as income tax relief."